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THEORY OF
SIMULATED EXISTENCE

Atoms as Binary Quantum Transistors

     1.      Introduction

1.1        The Atom as a Binary Quantum Transistor

     2.      The Nuclide of an Atom

2.1 Nuclide as an Equation

2.2 Nuclide Analogy

     3.      Atoms as Computer Chips

     4.      The Nuclide at Work

4.1. Photon-Based Communication

4.2. Photon Particle Transmission

     5.      The Brain as the Central Observer

5.1 Biological Senses and Brain

5.2. Brain as Quantum Computer Hard Drive

     6.      The Illusion of Solid Matter

6.1. Electron Repulsion

     7.      Conclusion

Theory of Simulated Existence

Atoms as Binary Quantum Transistors: An Exploration of the Fundamental Building Blocks of Physical Reality

Abstract: This paper delves into the fundamental nature of atoms, presenting them as binary quantum transistors that underpin the fabric of our physical reality. We explore the concept of the atom's nuclide, highlighting its role as an on/off switch within atomic structures. Furthermore, we elucidate how atoms function as microscopic computer chips, communicating information through a universal photon-based communication system. This communication, originating at the quantum level, permeates all levels of our perceived physical reality, and our biological senses play a pivotal role in decoding this information. The human brain, likened to a quantum computer hard drive, interprets, and constructs our perceived reality from this influx of atomic data. We assert that atoms, primarily composed of empty space, give rise to the illusion of a solid material world, which is, in essence, a tangible hologram created by the brain's interpretation of underlying energy fields. This paper challenges the conventional notion of physical reality by proposing that what we perceive as solid matter is, in fact, a product of our brains' intricate information processing.

Creating mathematical equations to describe the content of the paper is challenging since the content is largely conceptual and philosophical in nature. However, we can attempt to represent some of the key concepts in a mathematical form. Please note that these equations are highly abstract and symbolic, as they attempt to represent complex ideas in a simplified manner.

     1.Introduction

The atom, as the foundational unit of matter, has long captivated the curiosity of scientists and thinkers alike. This paper embarks on a journey to redefine the atom's nature by presenting it as a binary quantum transistor, a fundamental building block of our physical reality. We delve into the concept of the atom's nuclide and its role as an electrical component governing the behavior of electrons within atomic structures. Additionally, we explore how atoms function as microscopic computer chips, enabling the transmission of information through a photon-based communication system.

 

1.1The Atom as a Binary Quantum Transistor

Let A represent an atom. We can represent the atom's binary nature as follows:

A = (0, 1)

Where 0 represents the "off" state, and 1 represents the "on" state of the quantum transistor within the atom. See figure 1

     2.The Nuclide of an Atom

The nuclide of an atom refers to the combination of its proton and neutron subatomic particles. It is characterized by the number of protons, neutrons, and the associated energy content within the atomic nucleus. This concept is essential to understanding the mechanics of our simulated universe, where atoms function as binary quantum transistors. See figure 1.

Figure 1

Atoms BQ
INTRO
2 NUCLIE
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2.1 Nuclide as an Equation

Let N represent the nuclide of an atom. The nuclide consists of protons (P) and neutrons (N) within the atomic nucleus. The energy content (E) can be represented symbolically as:

N = (P, N, E)

This equation symbolically describes the composition of the nuclide.

2.2 Nuclide Analogy

To better comprehend the role of an atom's nuclide, we draw analogies to various information processing systems. Just as Jacquard's punch cards, Conway's Game of Life, and binary data systems operate using discrete elements, an atom's nuclide functions as an on/off switch within the atomic structure. It regulates the behavior of electrons and their associated electromagnetic fields, akin to logic gates in a computer.

     3.Atoms as Computer Chips

Atoms are postulated as microscopic computer chips operating within a quantum superposition binary system of zeros and ones. This interpretation challenges the conventional notion of atoms as static entities and posits that they actively communicate information. Atoms are omnipresent in our physical world, from the matter we touch to the air we breathe, and they serve as the universe's quantum resistors, encoding and transmitting sensory experiences through a universal photon-based communication system. See figure 2.

     4.The Nuclide at Work

The information is conveyed to us via photon particles, a concept yet to be discussed. Photon particles facilitate the exchange of information between atomic structures through photon tradeoffs, creating a pervasive web of communication in our simulated universe. See Figure 2

Figure 2

COMPUTER CHIPS
NUCLIDE AT ORK
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4.1. Photon-Based Communication

To represent the communication of information via photon particles (Ph), we can use a simple symbolic equation:

Information Transmission = Atom (A) ↔ Photon Particle (Ph)

This equation represents the bidirectional exchange of information between atoms and photon particles.

4.2. Photon Particle Transmission

The information stored within an atom's nuclide is transmitted through the electron logic gates located on the outskirts of the atom. These electrons act as multi-input output information transmitters. See figure 3.

Figure 3

BRAIN
6 MATER

     5.The Brain as the Central Observer

The human brain is central to our simulated universe as it houses the conscious observer. The brain's electrical potential, stemming from the data it receives from the environment via photons, enables consciousness to engage with the unfolding simulated universe within the construct of time. The brain's intricate network of neurons wired together serves as the mechanism by which reality is synthesized for each individual.

5.1 Biological Senses and Brain

Our biological senses play a crucial role in experiencing the physicality of our simulated universe. The information received through sight, taste, touch, smell, and hearing is relayed to the brain, which functions as the central processing unit (CPU) of our simulated universe. The brain, a complex quantum computer hard drive, processes the data encoded in photons, allowing consciousness to exist in the present moment within its own reference frame; experiencing all the photonic signals it is bombarded with.

5.2. Brain as Quantum Computer Hard Drive

The brain's role as a quantum computer hard drive can be represented as:

Brain (B) = Quantum Processing of Photonic Information

This equation highlights the brain's function as a processor of photonic information.

      6.The Illusion of Solid Matter

The paper challenges the conventional notion of physical reality by asserting that atoms, primarily composed of empty space, give rise to the illusion of a solid material world. When atoms are brought into contact, electron repulsion prevents objects from passing through each other. This repulsion creates the sensation of touch, but in reality, objects do not truly touch; they hover at a minuscule distance due to the electromagnetic force between their atomic structures.

6.1. Electron Repulsion

To represent the concept of electron repulsion preventing objects from passing through each other, we can use:

F_repulsion = k * (q1 * q2) / r^2

Where:

  • F_repulsion is the repulsive force.

  • k is Coulomb's constant.

  • q1 and q2 are the charges of the two electrons.

  • r is the distance between the electrons.

 

     7. Conclusion

This paper presents a paradigm shift in our understanding of atoms as binary quantum transistors that facilitate the communication and construction of our perceived physical reality. Atoms, with their nuclide components, are integral to a universal photon-based communication system that shapes our sensory experiences. The brain, functioning as a quantum computer hard drive, deciphers this information, and our reality is the result of this intricate process. The concept of a solid material world is debunked, revealing that the essence of our reality is an intricate, dynamic, and ever-evolving hologram, where atoms are the fundamental building blocks of experience.

These equations are symbolic and abstract representations of the concepts discussed in the paper. They do not provide quantitative predictions but rather serve to capture the essence of the ideas presented in the paper.

CONCLUSIN
Digital Reality Web Book Social Caver.png
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